Loading Events

Understanding Asset Management; challenges and opportunities

Event details

Date: 02.08.2022
Time: 09.30 – 12.00

Venue

via Zoom
See map

Tickets

The numbers below include tickets for this event already in your cart. Clicking "Get Tickets" will allow you to edit any existing attendee information as well as change ticket quantities.
Member A02822
$ 250.00
Unlimited
Nonmember 02822
$ 270.00
Unlimited

This short course is about understanding the asset management process in social housing. Asset management is often seen as a dry topic but when viewed as a process of housing provision and management over the life cycle of properties it is both interesting and challenging with substantial implications for quality tenancy management. This course overviews the life cycle approach to, and issues around, asset management starting from the design and construct stage, through maintenance, upgrade, renewal and finally disposal. At each stage complex issues must be worked through and challenging questions asked. And always in the background is the knowledge that community housing is a business. For example has Covid changed the need to rethink building design, how do we match new housing provision e.g. the Big Housing Build, to housing needs, what is the implications of priority allocations for property management, what are the issues in responsive maintenance, how do community agencies work with the private sector in a an estate redevelopment, what are the asset issues in stock transfers.

The course will cover:

  • What is asset management?
  • What are the key asset management stages?
  • What are the big asset management issues now?
  • What are the constraints around best practice in asset management?
  • What are the challenges in asset management?
  • What are the relationships between tenancy management and asset management?

It would be suitable for:

  • Management and team leaders
  • Staff with responsibility for tenancy and property management
 Mg 0059

Terry Burke is Professor of Housing studies at Swinburne University. He is one of Australia’s most well-known academic researchers and conceived, developed, and taught Swinburne’s suite of social  housing management courses (Grad Cert, Dip and Masters in Housing Management and Policy). He has served on many urban and housing advisory panels and committees for all levels of government.